Tuesday, October 18, 2005

The Price To Pay!

Not surprisingly, in a recent survery of the most expensive cities in America to live, New York came out on top. Congrats! Compared to an average family of four in Anywhere, USA who makes $60,000, New Yorkers have to earn nearly $150,000 to have the same purchasing power. Furthermore, nearly 70% of income has to be devoted to housing costs. This is all well and good as prices of your condos are going up 20% a year, but what will happen when prices start coming down. New York is going to be even more grumpy. The glowing facade of asset inflation will give way to the growling frowns of asset deflation. People have been in the fire for so long, they don't realized they're cooked.

I Love N.Y.

10 Comments:

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Blogger Bayarealawyers said...

Debt Consolidation
Debt Consolidation can help you reduce your interest burden by charging an interest rate lower than the rate on your existing loans. Debt consolidation loan can also allow you to make small monthly payments by extending the loan period

10:49 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

CREDIT CARD DEBT HELP FREE QUOTE......
Debt Consolidation entails taking out one loan to pay off many others. This is often done to secure a lower interest rate, secure a fixed interest rate or for the convenience of servicing only one loan.

Debt consolidation can simply be from a number of unsecured loans into another unsecured loan, but more often it involves a secured loan against an asset that serves as collateral, which is most commonly a house (in this case a mortgage is secured against the house.) The collateralization of the loan allows a lower interest rate than without it, because by collateralizing, the asset owner agrees to allow the forced sale (foreclosure) of the asset in order to pay back the loan. The risk to the lender is reduced so the interest rate offered is lower.

Sometimes, debt consolidation companies can discount the amount of the loan. When the debtor is in danger of bankruptcy, the debt consolidator will buy the loan at a discount. A prudent debtor can shop around for consolidators who will pass along some of the savings. Consolidation can affect the ability of the debtor to discharge debts in bankruptcy, so the decision to consolidate must be weighed carefully.

Debt consolidation is often advisable in theory when someone is paying credit card debt. Credit cards can carry a much larger interest rate than even an unsecured loan from a bank. Debtors with property such as a home or car may get a lower rate through a secured loan using their property as collateral. Then the total interest and the total cash flow paid towards the debt is lower allowing the debt to be paid off sooner, incurring less interest. In practice, many people are in credit card debt because they spend more than their income. If that habit continues, the consolidation will not benefit them much because they will simply increase their credit card balances again.

Because of the theoretical advantage that debt consolidation offers a consumer that has high interest debt balances, companies can take advantage of that benefit of refinancing to charge very high fees in the debt consolidation loan. Sometimes these fees are near the state maximum for mortgage fees. In addition, some unscrupulous companies will knowingly wait until a client has backed themselves into a corner and must refinance in order to consolidate and pay off bills that they are behind on the payments. If the client does not refinance they may lose their house, so they are willing to pay any allowable fee to complete the debt consolidation. In some cases the situation is that the client does not have enough time to shop for another lender with lower fees and may not even be fully aware of them. This practice is known as predatory lending. Certainly many, if not most, debt consolidation transactions do not involve predatory lending.

Student Loan Consolidation
In the United States, federal student loans are consolidated somewhat differently, as federal student loans are guaranteed by the U.S. government. In a federal student loan consolidation, existing loans are purchased and closed by a loan consolidation company or by the Department of Education (depending on what type of federal student loan the borrower holds). Interest rates for the consolidation are based on that year's student loan rate, which is in turn based on the 91-day Treasury bill rate at the last auction in May of each calendar year.

Student loan rates can fluctuate from the current low of 4.70% to a maximum of 8.25% for federal Stafford loans, 9% for PLUS loans. The current consolidation program allows students to consolidate once with a private lender, and reconsolidate again only with the Department of Education. Upon consolidation, a fixed interest rate is set based on the then-current interest rate. Reconsolidating does not change that rate. If the student combines loans of different types and rates into one new consolidation loan, a weighted average calculation will establish the appropriate rate based on the then-current interest rates of the different loans being consolidated together.

Federal student loan consolidation is often referred to as refinancing, which is incorrect because the loan rates are not changed, merely locked in. Unlike private sector debt consolidation, student loan consolidation does not incur any fees for the borrower; private companies make money on student loan consolidation by reaping subsidies from the federal government.

Student loan consolidation can be beneficial to students' credit rating, but it's important to note that not all federal student loan consolidation companies report their loans to all credit bureaus; Experian or Transunion, which means that students will have differing credit scores at Equifax Transunion, and Experian.

Mortgage Loan Types
There are many types of mortgage loans. The two basic types of amortized loans are the fixed rate mortgage (FRM) and adjustable rate mortgage.

In a FRM, the interest rate, and hence monthly payment, remains fixed for the life (or term) of the loan. In the U.S., the term is usually for 10, 15, 20, or 30 years. The only increase a consumer might see in their monthly payments would result from an increase in their property taxes or insurance rates (paid using an escrow account, if they've opted to use an escrow). But payments for principal and interest will be consistent throughout the life of the loan using an FRM.

In an ARM, the interest rate is fixed for a period of time, after which it will periodically (annually or monthly) adjust up or down to some market index. Common indices in the U.S. include the Prime Rate, the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR), and the Treasury Index ("T-Bill"). Other indexes like 11th District Cost of Funds Index, COSI, and MTA, are also available but are less popular.

Adjustable rates transfer part of the interest rate risk from the lender to the borrower, and thus are widely used where unpredictable interest rates make fixed rate loans difficult to obtain. Since the risk is transferred, lenders will usually make the initial interest rate of the ARM's note anywhere from 0.5% to 2% lower than the average 30-year fixed rate.

In most scenarios, the savings from an ARM outweigh its risks, making them an attractive option for people who are planning to keep a mortgage for ten years or less.

Additionally, lenders rely on credit reports and credit scores derived from them. The higher the score, the more creditworthy the borrower is assumed to be. Favorable interest rates are offered to buyers with high scores. Lower scores indicate higher risk to the lender, and lenders require higher interest rates in such scenarios to compensate for increased risk.

A partial amortization or balloon loan is one where the amount of monthly payments due are calculated (amortized) over a certain term, but the outstanding principal balance is due at some point short of that term. This payment is sometimes referred to as a "balloon payment". A balloon loan can be either a Fixed or Adjustable in terms of the Interest Rate. Many Second Trust mortgages use this feature. The most common way of describing a ''balloon loan'' uses the terminology X due in Y, where X is the number of years over which the loan is amortized, and Y is the year in which the principal balance is due. A contract could be written up so there would be more than one "balloon payment" required to be paid during the life of the loan.

Other loan types
Assumed mortgage
Blanket loan
Bridge loan
Budget loan
Commercial Loan
Deed of trust
Equity loan
Hard money loan
Jumbo mortgages
Package loan
Participation mortgage
Reverse mortgage
Repayment mortgage
Seasoned mortgage
Term loan or Interest-only loan
Wraparound mortgage
Negative amortization loan
Non-Conforming Mortgage

Debt Help can help you reduce your interest burden by charging an interest rate lower than the rate on your existing loans. Debt consolidation loan can also allow you to make small monthly payments by extending the loan period
http://www.debt-consolidation.com


CREDIT CARD DEBT HELP FREE QUOTE......

9:11 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Q: How does your Debt Settlement program work?
A: When you enroll in our debt settlement program, we set you up on a monthly payment that is as much as 50% lower than your current minimum monthly payment. In the meantime, we negotiate with the credit companies to get them to agree to substantially lower the amount you owe. Once you have saved enough money and a creditor has agreed to a pay off (normally 40 to 50 percent of what is owed), we pay off the credit card company with a lump sum settlement.


Q: What are the indications that I may need to join your Debt Settlement program?
A: Our debt settlement program is only for people facing financial HARDSHIP. This means people who are late on paying their debts, have lost their job, have little or no ability to pay their debts in the future and are facing a possible bankruptcy. We do not advocate that any person default on their debts. This program is not designed to negotiate debts for people who have reasonable means to pay off their debts. If you have the ability to pay your debts in the normal fashion, by paying minimum payments, then you should honor your debts and do so. This program is NOT for people who are gainfully employed, have high credit ratings and can meet their monthly debt obligations.


Q: What other debts, besides credit cards can I settle using your Debt Settlement program?
A: We are also able to deal with medical bills, personal loans, repossessions, department store cards, gas cards, and accounts in collections. Since we negotiate with your creditors, we are unable to work with mortgages and cars because they will be able to recover the property in the event that you do not pay according to the terms they stipulate. Student loans also might as well be considered "secured debts" because the federal government will allow a student loan creditor to take your tax refund or levy your bank account without a judgment if you default. Since the bankruptcy law changes in 2005, even private student loans cannot be discharged in a bankruptcy. In sum, we only deal with debts where we will have sufficient leverage in order to procure the lowest debt settlement possible.


Q. Does enrolling into a Debt Settlement program have a negative impact on my credit?
A: Yes, your credit score will decline due to entering this program. How much it will decline depends on your original circumstances. Most of the accounts you place into negotiation are likely to "charge-off", which will reflect negatively on your credit. However, once this charged off debt is settled, the settlement is reported to the credit bureaus. Settled accounts are positive compared to unresolved delinquent debts or bankruptcy. After all the debts have been settled and paid, the credit score should begin to improve since the negative items have been resolved. A high credit score is desirable to have, but if you have a financial hardship and are unable to pay your debts, then your first priority should be to pay your delinquent debts and get back on your feet financially.


Q: Does enrolling into a Debt Settlement program stop collection calls from my creditors?
A: No. Your creditors have every right to try and contact you in order to collect a debt. However, we have been successful in eliminating most harassing telephone calls. If your account is in collections; collections agencies have to adhere to the Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (FDCPA). The FDCPA specifically states that a debt collector is obligated to contact third-parties with a Power of Attorney instead of the debtor. Once you enroll in our debt settlement program, we fax or mail a Power of Attorney to your creditors notifying them that we are handling your account.


Q: Can I still use my credit cards?
A: NO. All credit cards in the program will not be active and you will not have credit privileges. Any cards you DO NOT put into the program should not be used except for emergency purposes. This program is for you to get out of debt.


Q: Should I close my credit card accounts after enrolling in your debt settlement program?
A: Yes, you should close your account. In general, it is far better for an account to read "account closed by consumer" on your credit report versus "account closed by credit grantor." It shows to any future lenders that you took the initiative in your situation, which is helpful.


Q: What is the difference between Debt Settlement and Credit Counseling?
A: In a debt settlement program, negotiators work on your behalf to reduce your balance by up to 50%. In a credit counseling program, counselors work to reduce interest rates. The average credit card debt settlement program lasts between 1 and 3 years, whereas credit counseling services last for between 4 and 6 years. In general debt settlement tends to be a more aggressive approach to debt elimination.


Q: What is the difference between Debt Settlement and Debt Consolidation?
A: There are two types of debt consolidation: secured and unsecured debt consolidation. With secured debt consolidation, a consumer gets a loan that is collateralized by a home or vehicle to pay off their credit card debt, and then pays back the loan at lower interest since it is secured by property. With an unsecured debt consolidation loan, a consumer gets a loan from a bank, presumably at a marginally lower interest rate, to pay off their credit card debt. Debt Settlement does not involve lending, but rather negotiating with credit card companies and other creditors to reduce the amount you owe.


Q: What is the difference between Debt Settlement and bankruptcy?
A: Debt settlement is very different from bankruptcy. For starters, bankruptcy has far wider implications for your credit versus Debt Settlement. Bankruptcy is a suitable alternative for consumers who do not have any income or are seeking debt relief for secured debts like mortgages and car loans. In a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, the court orders a debtor to liquidate all of their non-exempt property and pays the creditors back with the proceeds from their sale. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, the court orders a debtor to turn over all their disposable income for 5 years.


Q. Can I be sued while I am enrolled in a Debt Settlement program?
A: Yes, your creditors certainly have the right to sue to recover their money. But usually the purpose of the lawsuit is to force a settlement on the matter. In our experience, most creditors would rather not go to the expense of suing and simply try to negotiate a settlement.


Q: What will I pay for your services?
We charge a 15% fee which is calculated based on the total amount of debt that an individual brings into the debt settlement program. This fee is recovered from your monthly payments in the first 12-15 months of the program. All costs and fees are always fully disclosed and you are required to sign for approval before you commit to our program.


Q: Can I apply for other credit while enrolled in the Debt Settlement program?
A: No, you cannot apply for other credit while enrolled because it could affect our ability to negotiate with the credit card companies. In some cases they will say, "If this client was having trouble with his or her debt, why have they applied for other credit cards after they enrolled in your program?" Moreover, the goal of our credit card debt settlement service is to help our clients become debt free, and applying for other credit cards while you were enrolled would defeat the original purpose of the program.


Q: Are there any tax implications associated with enrolling in the Debt Settlement program?
A: Yes, it is possible that you may be taxed on the savings related to our settling of your credit card debt. However, for clients who are technically insolvent, then the IRS only requires that you file a form 982, which exempts you from having to pay taxes on the savings from your credit card debt settlement program. The IRS defines insolvency as financial state in which someone owes more (liabilities) than the value of their assets. Many of our clients fall under this category, but you should consult a tax attorney for advice regarding your situation. Secondly, even if you are taxed on the savings from debt settlement, you still save a lot of money. Remember, you are only taxed on a percentage of the savings. That is, if our debt settlement program saved you $2000 off one of your credit cards and you had to pay 25 percent of that amount to the IRS ($500), then you still saved approximately $1500 and thousands of dollars more when you factor in the interest charges you did not have to pay.


Q: What are my responsibilities throughout the Debt Settlement program?
A: Your main responsibilities are to be truthful and to make your monthly payment as planned. Without ample savings we will be unable to obtain settlements from the credit card companies. If you will have trouble making your monthly payment, then it is important that you notify us 5 business days in advance, so you do not get charged for having insufficient funds. Moreover, it is important to stay in touch with us, so we always have quick and easy access to you during the negotiation process in the event that we need you to supply our debt settlement experts with any important information regarding your credit card accounts.


Q: Can I include accounts into the Debt Settlement program that have authorized users or co-applicants?
A: Before enrolling any credit cards with co-applicants, we ask that the co-applicant sign a waiver acknowledging that they are allowing the account to be included in our debt settlement program. For authorized users, we advise that you ask the credit card company to remove the person from the account prior to enrollment. If this does not work, we will need the authorized user to sign a waiver acknowledging that they allow the account to be included in the debt settlement program.


Q: What is the difference between credit card debt settlement and credit repair?
A: Credit repair involves removing inaccurate or unverifiable information off your credit report. Clients of our credit card debt settlement program will oftentimes use credit repair after their debts are eliminated to more rapidly increase their credit scores. Unlike debt settlement, however, credit repair cannot eliminate debts that you actually owe.


Q: Do you make payments to each of my credit cards every month?
A: No, we negotiate with your credit card companies to lower the amount that you owe. Once you have saved enough money and one of the credit card companies has agreed to lower the amount you owe, we pay them off with a lump sum settlement of your debt

10:32 PM  

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